July 30, 2014 at 1:49am
7 notes
Reblogged from viperslang

viperslang:

Art has a double face, of expression and illusion, just like science has a double face: the reality of error and the phantom of truth. 
René Daumal, The Lie of the Truth

July 29, 2014 at 9:17pm
1,555 notes
Reblogged from nevver
nevver:

Shark week, every week.

nevver:

Shark week, every week.

4:41pm
186 notes
Reblogged from girlbreath
architectureofdoom:

girlbreath:

lady eaton college in a blizzard

View this on the map

architectureofdoom:

girlbreath:

lady eaton college in a blizzard

View this on the map

4:41pm
3,112 notes
Reblogged from fridaynotes

(Source: fridaynotes, via streetetiquette)

12:54pm
158 notes
Reblogged from brutereason

http://brutereason.tumblr.com/post/93217521268/mr-muppetface-brutereason-a-big-challenge-in →

mr-muppetface:

brutereason:

A big challenge in activism is fighting harmful things without necessarily shaming, stigmatizing, and belittling people who buy into those harmful things. For instance: pseudoscience, fundamentalism, altmed, normative beauty standards. It’s tempting to…

12:52pm
8,373 notes
Reblogged from humansofnewyork
humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

12:50pm
5,228 notes
Reblogged from wordsthat-speak

What a strange illusion it is to suppose that beauty is goodness.

— Leo Tolstoy (via wordsthat-speak)

(via wordsthat-speak)

2:15am
2,390 notes
Reblogged from allisonburtch

The problem is no longer getting people to express themselves, but providing little gaps of solitude and silence in which they might eventually find something to say. Repressive forces don’t stop people from expressing themselves, but rather, force them to express themselves. What a relief to have nothing to say, the right to say nothing, because only then is there a chance of framing the rare, or ever rarer, the thing that might be worth saying.

— Gilles Deleuze, “Mediators” (via allisonburtch)

(via sylvides)

July 28, 2014 at 8:53pm
39 notes
Reblogged from howitzerliterarysociety

If heaven isn’t a great coffee shop overhanging every single galaxy simultaneously where one can look out the window and see infinite mysteries in instantaneous explanation then I don’t know…

— (via howitzerliterarysociety)

(Source: it-is-a-black-and-white-world, via howitzerliterarysociety)