August 27, 2014 at 12:19am
20,404 notes
Reblogged from 4nimalparty
4nimalparty:

evergreen tea… (by Samantha Lamb)

4nimalparty:

evergreen tea… (by Samantha Lamb)

(via shackleboltrps)

12:18am
98,882 notes
Reblogged from fuckyeahwinter

fuckyeahwinter:

Bright Colored Night

source

(via shackleboltrps)

12:08am
3,909 notes
Reblogged from mcsquishyface

mcsquishyface:

Sunrise on Mount Katahdin, Maine.

(via shackleboltrps)

August 26, 2014 at 2:57pm
26 notes
Reblogged from wordwordwordwordwordword

http://electric-cereal.tumblr.com/post/95841017403/wordwordwordwordwordword-if-a-poem-starts-with →

wordwordwordwordwordword:

if a poem starts with “i want” i stop reading

"i want" poems are the most boring poems

think of another way to say what u mean without indulging in a language of consumeristic masturbation jeez

like yea

we all want stuff

that doesn’t make a good poem

i also…

August 25, 2014 at 10:33pm
2,675 notes
Reblogged from likeafieldmouse
likeafieldmouse:

Hernan Bas - The Last Protester at the Last Monument to War (2009)

likeafieldmouse:

Hernan Bas - The Last Protester at the Last Monument to War (2009)

(via entfaltet)

7:14pm
53 notes
Reblogged from brightwalldarkroom
brightwalldarkroom:

Bebe Ballroom on Rocky (1976)
"No one ever told me how beautiful Sylvester Stallone was in 1976. Sunken-in eyes, almost able to make out the skull beneath the skin. Big, permanently wounded doll eyes, surprisingly smooth skin, face like a basset hound. How Adrien’s features complemented Rocky’s perfectly—fair skin, black hair, deflated cheeks—as if her skull were the female version of a pair, Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden.
Like Inception’s dream within a dream within a dream, Rocky is an underdog within an underdog within an underdog. Rocky lives in a small rundown apartment, wins or loses fights for small change, and is mostly alone. When he warns a teenage girl about the consequences of hanging out with the “coconuts on the corner,” he does so with a seasoned tongue, like he’s been one of those coconuts. “They don’t remember you,” he tells her, “they remember the rest.” He’s southpaw without a trainer who’s been kicked out of his gym of ten years. In a time when calling someone a bum was an insult that carried significant weight, much of the film is people telling Rocky, directly to his face, that he’s a bum.”
—
This is an excerpt from the current August issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine. To read the rest, purchase a copy of the issue for $2, or subscribe annually for $20. 

brightwalldarkroom:

Bebe Ballroom on Rocky (1976)

"No one ever told me how beautiful Sylvester Stallone was in 1976. Sunken-in eyes, almost able to make out the skull beneath the skin. Big, permanently wounded doll eyes, surprisingly smooth skin, face like a basset hound. How Adrien’s features complemented Rocky’s perfectly—fair skin, black hair, deflated cheeks—as if her skull were the female version of a pair, Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden.

Like Inception’s dream within a dream within a dream, Rocky is an underdog within an underdog within an underdog. Rocky lives in a small rundown apartment, wins or loses fights for small change, and is mostly alone. When he warns a teenage girl about the consequences of hanging out with the “coconuts on the corner,” he does so with a seasoned tongue, like he’s been one of those coconuts. “They don’t remember you,” he tells her, “they remember the rest.” He’s southpaw without a trainer who’s been kicked out of his gym of ten years. In a time when calling someone a bum was an insult that carried significant weight, much of the film is people telling Rocky, directly to his face, that he’s a bum.”

This is an excerpt from the current August issue of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine. To read the rest, purchase a copy of the issue for $2, or subscribe annually for $20. 

3:48pm
633 notes
Reblogged from supersonicart

supersonicart:

Flavia Maria Pitis, Paintings.

Transylvanian painter Flavia Maria Pitis depicts humans in the midst of metamorphosis.  With closer inspection of these transformations it would seem the characters are becoming their memories.  See more of the haunting work below:

Read More

12:54pm
685 notes
Reblogged from rebeccamock

rebeccamock:

Laundry Story (excerpt pgs 5-8)

I’m sorry for dumping so many posts all at once guys! Its just that everything is happening at once this week. Laundry Story is a 12-page comic I drew after a conversation with Aimee Fleck about our mutual love of laundromats. I drew this during stolen hours late at night and between projects. A small edition is being printed just for TCAF! Come see me and Maritsa Patrinos at table 242 :)

August 24, 2014 at 11:55pm
18,513 notes
Reblogged from nympheline
nympheline:

This is my favourite bookstore and bookseller in the world. Bar none.
I used to get to Seattle every six months or so, and whenever I visited I always made it a priority to stop in BLMF and ask its keeper what he’d been reading lately. He possessed an inexhaustible memory, a comfortable lack of snobbery, and impeccable taste. The first book he recommended to me, upon listening gravely to my litany of at-the-moment authors (Barbara Kingsolver, James Clavell, Maeve Binchy, Neil Gaiman, Charles DeLint, Anthony Bourdain) was Tipping the Velvet. He also later landed me with Geek Love, Anno Dracula, half the Aubreyad, and more modern Literature-with-a-capital-L than I could carry home.
The next-to-last time I dropped in, I asked if he had any P. G. Wodehouse.
"I have zero Wodehouse," he said, "and here’s why…"
Turned out that some fiend had taken to creeping in every month or so expressly to inquire of any Wodehouse and, once led to the volumes, to buy it all. ALL. Didn’t matter the condition, the edition, or whether he had another just like it in his possession; the villain bought every single P. G. Wodehouse in stock, every single time.
Was he a fan more comprehensive, more truly fanatical than any other I’d heard of, let alone known? Was he virulently anti-Wodehouse, only purchasing the books to keep their wry poison from infecting the impressionable masses? The world may never know.
I didn’t get any Wodehouse then, and I didn’t really feel the lack. I found plenty of other treasures that trip. But here’s one reason why BLMF and its proprietor are my favourite of their kind: that was two years ago, you see. Maybe three. In all that interim, I never planted foot in that bookshop. Never called. Never wrote. And I’m one face out of hundreds of thousands, dear reader; one reader he saw twice a year for three years, then not again for another three.
But I walked in the shop last Friday. Nodded hello.
"Can I help you find anything?" he asked, lifting his head from the phone.
"No, I’m good," I said.
"Wait—hold on a second." He set the phone down, walked ‘round the towers of books balanced precariously on the desk, on the floor, and atop other, only slightly less precarious towers. He jerked his head conspiratorially toward the far end of the shop, led me carefully to a shelf way in the back, removed a tattered stack of mass market paperbacks and motioned me closer to see what they’d been hiding.
Fifteen pristine Wodehouses: crisp, heavy, and—
“Hardcover,” he said, and waggled his eyebrows.
Reader, I bought them all.

nympheline:

This is my favourite bookstore and bookseller in the world. Bar none.

I used to get to Seattle every six months or so, and whenever I visited I always made it a priority to stop in BLMF and ask its keeper what he’d been reading lately. He possessed an inexhaustible memory, a comfortable lack of snobbery, and impeccable taste. The first book he recommended to me, upon listening gravely to my litany of at-the-moment authors (Barbara Kingsolver, James Clavell, Maeve Binchy, Neil Gaiman, Charles DeLint, Anthony Bourdain) was Tipping the Velvet. He also later landed me with Geek Love, Anno Dracula, half the Aubreyad, and more modern Literature-with-a-capital-L than I could carry home.

The next-to-last time I dropped in, I asked if he had any P. G. Wodehouse.

"I have zero Wodehouse," he said, "and here’s why…"

Turned out that some fiend had taken to creeping in every month or so expressly to inquire of any Wodehouse and, once led to the volumes, to buy it all. ALL. Didn’t matter the condition, the edition, or whether he had another just like it in his possession; the villain bought every single P. G. Wodehouse in stock, every single time.

Was he a fan more comprehensive, more truly fanatical than any other I’d heard of, let alone known? Was he virulently anti-Wodehouse, only purchasing the books to keep their wry poison from infecting the impressionable masses? The world may never know.

I didn’t get any Wodehouse then, and I didn’t really feel the lack. I found plenty of other treasures that trip. But here’s one reason why BLMF and its proprietor are my favourite of their kind: that was two years ago, you see. Maybe three. In all that interim, I never planted foot in that bookshop. Never called. Never wrote. And I’m one face out of hundreds of thousands, dear reader; one reader he saw twice a year for three years, then not again for another three.

But I walked in the shop last Friday. Nodded hello.

"Can I help you find anything?" he asked, lifting his head from the phone.

"No, I’m good," I said.

"Wait—hold on a second." He set the phone down, walked ‘round the towers of books balanced precariously on the desk, on the floor, and atop other, only slightly less precarious towers. He jerked his head conspiratorially toward the far end of the shop, led me carefully to a shelf way in the back, removed a tattered stack of mass market paperbacks and motioned me closer to see what they’d been hiding.

Fifteen pristine Wodehouses: crisp, heavy, and—

Hardcover,” he said, and waggled his eyebrows.

Reader, I bought them all.

(via kathrynmc)

12:43am
264 notes
Reblogged from violentwavesofemotion

I need the day’s sharpness—

deeper water,
something alive to sift

through me and kill.

— Alex Dimitrov, from All Souls Day (via violentwavesofemotion)

(via butterfliesyoureadtome)