October 20, 2014 at 1:12am
19,185 notes
Reblogged from gonnagetcaged

gonnagetcaged:

"what can you do with an art history degree???"

image

this

(via blue-voids)

October 17, 2014 at 9:35pm
891 notes
Reblogged from likeafieldmouse

Human life is but a series of footnotes to a vast obscure unfinished masterpiece.

— Vladimir Nabokov (via likeafieldmouse)

6:57pm
3 notes
Reblogged from sylvides

5:29pm
1,534 notes
Reblogged from thievinggenius
thievinggenius:

Done by Dan Fletcher.
@blindvulture

thievinggenius:

Done by Dan Fletcher.

@blindvulture

(via plastexxx)

4:38pm
25,087 notes
Reblogged from now-youre-cool
howitzerliterarysociety:

crashyourcrew:

Realm

These are artists making work with one eye over their shoulder and the other on their canvas.  Imagine what they would come up with if the city came to its senses and let them play properly. 

howitzerliterarysociety:

crashyourcrew:

Realm

These are artists making work with one eye over their shoulder and the other on their canvas.  Imagine what they would come up with if the city came to its senses and let them play properly. 

4:36pm
241 notes
Reblogged from clintcatalyst

clintcatalyst:

Crucifix Hill : Sialuliai, Lithuania
Photography : Daniel Roos

"In a field near the north of Sialuliai in Lithuania, millions of crucifixes and icons are packed tight together. According to an old saying, the first crucifix was placed there by a father, who wanted to pray to God for his gravely ill daughter. The father wandered with his cross to the hill. He raised it at the highest point and asked God for forgiveness and to make his daughter well again. After his prayers he returned home and found to his astonishment and thankfulness that his daughter had been cured by a miracle. People now started pilgrimming to the hill. Always with some kind of a crucifix or icon in their hands. This act was dedicated to God."
 

(via sylvides)

October 16, 2014 at 2:50pm
107 notes
Reblogged from brightwalldarkroom
brightwalldarkroom:

Excerpt from the new issue: Kate Horowitz on Only Lovers Left Alive (2013):

"Bram Stoker built his vampire to mirror mankind’s animal side. Dracula was all our wildness, our base desires, our ravenous predation upon the pure among us. Jim Jarmusch’s vampires, portrayed with exquisite androgyny by Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton, are just the opposite—it is his humans (or ”zombies,” in the patois of the film) who are beastly, thoughtlessly indulging their degenerate impulses. The zombies have poisoned the water, they’ve poisoned the earth, and now they’ve managed to poison their own bodies, their very blood. We’ve done it now, Jarmusch says. We’ve pissed in the Garden .
Elsewhere, Adam and Eve take their lives in elegant, measured mouthfuls. They sip their ruby liquid meals from crystal cordial glasses. They live on music, on poetry, on silver thermoses of untainted black-market blood. By some agreement, the lovers live thousands of miles apart, uniting once a century for a honeymoon. They have their art, their science, their memories, and the clear, bright bond of their love to sustain them. They feed each other glittering morsels of information. Eve caresses her antique books and Adam his rare guitars, but these touches express reverence, not desire—love, not greed. Living, loving, and even suffering look chic and effortless in their cool white hands. On a night flight to Tangiers the exhausted lovers lean upon each other in perfect repose, her pale face eclipsing the darkness of his hair.”

(Subscribe to BW/DR annually for $20 to read the full essay and the rest of the October issue)

brightwalldarkroom:

Excerpt from the new issue: Kate Horowitz on Only Lovers Left Alive (2013):

"Bram Stoker built his vampire to mirror mankind’s animal side. Dracula was all our wildness, our base desires, our ravenous predation upon the pure among us. Jim Jarmusch’s vampires, portrayed with exquisite androgyny by Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton, are just the opposite—it is his humans (or ”zombies,” in the patois of the film) who are beastly, thoughtlessly indulging their degenerate impulses. The zombies have poisoned the water, they’ve poisoned the earth, and now they’ve managed to poison their own bodies, their very blood. We’ve done it now, Jarmusch says. We’ve pissed in the Garden .

Elsewhere, Adam and Eve take their lives in elegant, measured mouthfuls. They sip their ruby liquid meals from crystal cordial glasses. They live on music, on poetry, on silver thermoses of untainted black-market blood. By some agreement, the lovers live thousands of miles apart, uniting once a century for a honeymoon. They have their art, their science, their memories, and the clear, bright bond of their love to sustain them. They feed each other glittering morsels of information. Eve caresses her antique books and Adam his rare guitars, but these touches express reverence, not desire—love, not greed. Living, loving, and even suffering look chic and effortless in their cool white hands. On a night flight to Tangiers the exhausted lovers lean upon each other in perfect repose, her pale face eclipsing the darkness of his hair.”

(Subscribe to BW/DR annually for $20 to read the full essay and the rest of the October issue)

12:46pm
952 notes
Reblogged from beatonna
beatonna:

If you enjoyed poking fun at genres with Femme Fatale, and if you like smart parody, give Nonsense Novels by Stephen Leacock a spin.  It’s one of my favourite humour collections of all time.  Leacock is perhaps not very well known outside his native land, but he is a grandfather of parody, among the best of them.  Nonsense Novels was first published in 1911, and takes on several literary tropes, the first - as you see here - is the Great Detective.  The link is to a nice pdf of the whole book.

beatonna:

If you enjoyed poking fun at genres with Femme Fatale, and if you like smart parody, give Nonsense Novels by Stephen Leacock a spin.  It’s one of my favourite humour collections of all time.  Leacock is perhaps not very well known outside his native land, but he is a grandfather of parody, among the best of them.  Nonsense Novels was first published in 1911, and takes on several literary tropes, the first - as you see here - is the Great Detective.  The link is to a nice pdf of the whole book.

2:20am
59,737 notes
Reblogged from 9c9bs

rawr0609:

9c9bs:

The real problem with people fussing over Pluto all the time is it represents the priorities of the public - preserving traditions rather than accepting facts. The pursuit of science is about building a sustainable catalog of truths, and there is no advantage in altering truths to appease nostalgia. 

wow

(via thingsthatarentchangingtheworld)

1:35am
21 notes
Reblogged from lebuc

trappedamidstmythoughts said: What authors and poets do you enjoy reading?

viperslang:

lebuc:

Hi!

I’ve been having issues with my mail/inbox/outbox the past couple of days, so bear with me, please…

My reading is so random, that thinking about listing authors is really problematic for me…i span eras, genres, nationalities, ages and formats - from anime to philosophy, fiction, documentatries, magazines, scholastic journals, indie mags and comics, classical lit to ‘…for dummies’, poets on the poetry tag here at tumblr…it’s so hard for me to say what is representative - i’m so all over the map…

let’s say i like ovid’s referential value, vonnegut’s tone, e.e.cummings sensibility, achebe’s perspective, morrison’s rendering of detail, dumas’ thematic exposition, khayyam’s placidity& presence, foster-wallace’s grandeur, octavia butler’s humanity, tumblr’s viperslang’s lexicon, krishnamurti’s exposition, casteneda’s metaphysical conjure, lao-tse’s wisdom to name a few…

tho these drown out all of the contemporary writers who haven’t yet gained a foothold in this brain o’mine…

further, the faith and whimsy of c.s.lewis, the conviction of ayn rand, the fervor of fanon, the insouciant insight of oscar wilde, the consciousness of madhubuti, the cogency of chekov, the irony of poe. the resilience of weisel - you see, this list can be nearly endless…hope this helps. peace.

WHOA!
*dies*